Learn to be an Herbalist

By Chestnut School of Herbal Medicine

how to be an herbalistIt’s an exciting time to be an herbalist as more and more people are using medicinal herbs for health and well-being. Nearly one-third of Americans use medicinal herbs, and the World Health Organization estimates that 80 percent of people worldwide still rely on herbs as their primary form of health care. This botanical medicine momentum translates to more interest in herbal products and herbalism; there are more opportunities than ever for rewarding employment in the field as well as golden opportunities for entrepreneurship.

To help spread the herbal word, the Chestnut School of Herbal Medicine has put together a *free* guide on how to start your herbal career. It’s 95 pages gushing with information for brand new and seasoned herbalists alike, including:

  • How to become a thriving herbalist
  • Getting the right herbal education
  • An herbalist’s salary & career opportunities
  • Debunking the mythic “Certified Herbalist”
  • Legalities of herbal products businesses in the U.S.

Get your free copy here: https://chestnutherbs.com/budding-herbalist-guide/

Samull Grant Awarded to 10 Classrooms

Samull Grant Awarded to 10 Classrooms

image3The Herb Society of America is giving $300 in “seed money” to 10 classrooms throughout the United States to foster learning and environmental appreciation. The funds are used for supplies such as soil, plant trays, containers, youth-sized tools, and more to establish classroom herb gardens.

“Garden based learning is a tremendous way for kids to learn not just about plants but science, math, history, geography, life skills, and more,” says Rie Sluder, president of The Herb Society of America. “We are impressed with the plans that the teachers have to use the “seed” money, and love that the Samull Classroom Herb Garden Grants create opportunities for children to learn about the important role herbs play in our everyday lives.”

The Samull Classroom Herb Garden Grant was founded in 2009 by the estate of teacher Donald Samull. An elementary school teacher, Mr. Samull used his love of herbs to teach his students about nature. Today, the Samull Classroom Herb Garden Grant honors his love of herbs and continues that tradition of combining teaching and the environment.

Jefferson elementary - st louis missouri - samull grantThis year’s recipients are…

  • Creation Kids Village School – Celebration, Florida
  • Esparto Middle School – Esparto, California
  • Corvallis Waldorf School – Corvallis, Oregon
  • James B. Edwards Elementary School – Mount Pleasant, South Carolina
  • Milwaukee Parkside School for the Arts – Milwaukee, Wisconsin
  • Harrison Center’s 21st Century Community Learning – Port Huron, Michigan
  • Youth Opportunities Unlimited – New Bedford, Massachusetts
  • Dutch Ridge Elementary School – Beaver, Pennsylvania
  • Stone Springs Elementary School – Harrisonburg, Virginia
  • Kaelakehe Elementary School – Kailua-Kona, Hawaii

The 2018-2019 grant was able to supply more schools because of the one-time generous grant from the FJ Foundation. To choose the winners, the Samull Classroom Herb Garden Grant Committee’s five members, read nearly 170 applications and reviewed the applications three times, according to Chair Peggy Rados,

To learn more about how our awardees plan to use the seed money please visit the grant webpage.

 

Herb Maker Gift-Giving Idea: Glassware

Herb Maker Gift-Giving Idea: Glassware

I’ve asked five blog contributors to share their favorite herb-related gift ideas.  HSA’s blog will be running one per day during the first week of December. – Paris Wolfe, Blogmaster

By Andrea Jackson, HSA Member

glassware 2I spent some time thinking about herbal holiday gifts. What is it that I just can’t do without and what is it that always thrills me when I receive it. Are you ready?

Glassware!  Yup, all different kinds.

Mason jars of all sizes for jams and jellies and to age potpourri and to store bulk herbs and to keep elderberry syrup and habanero hot sauce. And then there are corked topped glass cylinders for stacked potpourri and roller top glass vials for perfumes and tiny glass cork topped vials for mixing essential oils to make new perfume blends. Oh, and recycled decorative liqueur bottles for homemade herbal liqueurs and cordials. Lovely antique vanity jars look enticing on the shelf just waiting to be filled with body butters and face creams.  Don’t forget the screw-top brown bottles for tinctures and bitters.

Bale-topped bottles stand waiting to be filled with vinegars or ginger beer or herbal soda concentrates and tiny pots for herb mixes or herbal salts. I am fortunate enough to have a group of friends who often drop off various bottles for me and when I reward them with a homemade herbal goodie they know if they bring back the empty container they will always get a refill.

Gift giving contest

Herb Cook Gift-Giving Idea: Drying Rack

I’ve asked five blog contributors to share their favorite herb-related gift ideas.  HSA’s blog will be running one per day during the first week of December. – Paris Wolfe, Blogmaster

By Mary Nell Jackson, HSA Member

herb drying rack 2Drying my herbal harvest often takes over my home. No more eating on the dining room table because baskets of herbs are gathered en masse; guest beds hold large, drying baskets.

A few months ago on a leisurely day I settled in to check out my Instagram  account and as I scrolled, up popped a photo of a hanging black mesh, tiered,  cylinder herb-drying rack filled with a herbal harvest.  The source was not given but from that moment on I was hooked on finding my own drying rack.

I googled Amazon and to my delight up popped many choices of mesh drying racks.

I researched each choice for my needs and decided on a four-tiered model with zipper closures. A week later my holy basil and passion vine blossoms had a perfect place to dry and my dining table and guest beds were swept free of drying baskets.

I hung my cylinder drying rack in an out-of-the-way corner in an entry porch room that usually stays cooler year around; perfect place to dry my herbs and a great place to check on them as I come and go about my day.

I’ve gifted myself and my herb gardening friend for her birthday; we both are smitten.  I can’t think of a better holiday gift to give an herb gardener, wish I had been introduced to this nifty drying rack 20 years ago perhaps my husband would have welcomed my herbal harvest!

Gift giving contest

Herbal Kitchen Gift-Giving: A Large Stainless Bowl

I’ve asked five blog contributors to share their favorite herb-related gift ideas.  HSA’s blog will be running one per day during the first week of December.– Paris Wolfe, Blogmaster

By Peggy Riccio, member, Potomac Unit of the Herb Society of America

stainless-steel-bowl.jpgWhen I was studying horticulture at Virginia Tech, I was required to complete an internship. I spent the summer with a young married couple on a Maryland farm. The land came from the husband’s side of the family and the wife, armed with her masters in horticulture from Virginia Tech, was determined to turn it into a successful produce farm. Although they had help from the local high school kids, I was their first college intern.

At the end of the summer, they thanked me by giving me a large metal bowl. Thirty-six years later, they have a very successful produce farm and I use this bowl almost every week. It is the perfect size and weight for washing herbs. Although I do not spray my herbs, I always soak them in cold water after I cut them. Inevitably, something crawls out.

The bowl is heavy enough to be able hold the weight of the water and large enough for handfuls of green herbs. I have also learned that cheap plastic bowls are flimsy and collapse under the weight of the water. To anyone growing herbs, I recommend purchasing a large metal bowl to wash your herbs regardless if you spray or not.

Gift giving contest

Author Peggy Riccio gardens in a typical suburban Northern Virginia home. She graduated from Virginia Tech with a horticulture degree and has been involved in horticultural communications for more than 20 years. Currently, she is a member of the Garden Writers Association and the Potomac Unit of the Herb Society of America. Riccio produces pegplant.com, a local gardening website for the Northern Virginia, Maryland, and Washington DC metro area. Pegplant offers local gardening news, resources, and information about gardening, gardens, and plants.

 

 

 

 

 

Herb Gardener Gift-Giving Idea: Hori-Hori

Herb Gardener Gift-Giving Idea: Hori-Hori

I’ve asked five blog contributors to share their favorite herb-related gift ideas.  HSA’s blog will be running one per day during the first week of December. – Paris Wolfe, Blogmaster

By Beth Schreibman-Gehring, Chairman of Education for The Western Reserve Herb Society unit of The Herb Society of America

image2My father had over three acres of the most glorious organic gardens, filled with historic roses, lilies, and every kind of beautiful perennial and herb imaginable. I remember perfect summer evenings when he’d wander his gardens with a cocktail in one hand and a sprinkling hose in the other. He taught me everything I know about growing beautiful gardens organically and with a minimum of intervention.

The funny thing about my father is that he didn’t have a garage full of tools. He wasn’t into the latest, greatest gardening anything, well except for permaculture which really isn’t a latest and greatest secret. Like any other gardener he had shovels and clippers and long-handled pruners, but for his constant companion he preferred a simpler tool, a very sharp and well-made Japanese all- purpose gardening stainless knife called a hori-hori.

It wasn’t until I had my own gardens that I really appreciated his sensibility. My stainless steel hori-hori  is five garden tools in one. I can measure planting depth with it. I can prune with it. I can saw with its serrated edge and I can dig with its straight edge. It’s the easiest way that I know to draw and define a perfect circle for planting shrubs and trees.  My romantic father used to cut my mother beautiful bouquets of his glorious roses with it.  He has been gone for many years now but his native wisdom still lingers. I own two of these.

My favorite hori-hori is sold by http://www.barebonesliving.com and it comes with a wonderful sheath to house it in with a strong stainless steel clip. I’ve given so many of them as gifts that I’ve practically lost count and the fact that you’ll feel like a real gardening badass when you’ve got it clipped to your belt never hurts. It even has a notch for cutting twine or opening an ice cold bottle.

Gift giving contest

Herb Gardener Gift-Giving Idea: Light

I’ve asked five blog contributors to share their favorite herb-related gift ideas.  HSA’s blog will be running one per day during the first week of December. – Paris Wolfe, Blogmaster

By Kathleen M Hale, Western Reserve Herb Society

light.jpgBeing a somewhat difficult person, what I want most during the holiday season is what, by definition, is in shortest supply…light.  Candles in the darkness are very sweet.  But I mean LIGHT.

We are all starved for light in the darkness of winter.  But gardeners, in spite of exchanging hopeful and philosophical images on Facebook about how all the growing things are only sleeping, are left bereft.  Plant and seed catalogs will soon arrive, and whether you consider them aspirational or plant porn, they feed the hunger for the time when light returns and growth becomes visible.  But gardeners are patient. They can wait.

Gift giving contestUnless they have a really awesome light rig!  Yes, I have a lot of natural light in this house, when there’s any to come by.  But I also have a three-tier, pebble tray lined light cart, with growing lights on a timer and a gentle clip-on fan to wheedle the plants and seedlings entrusted therein into thinking this is the real thing. It is presently serving the needs of scented geranium cuttings, a bunch of amaryllises brought back to life from last year, assorted Christmas cacti and the mighty Cthulhu, the first aloe I ever acquired, now too big to put anywhere else.

I inherited my light rig from my late mother-in-law, Mertena Hood Hale.  She was an extraordinary gardener. So, in my case, the light is brighter, because it also brings with it the magic of a torch passed from one gardener to another, across time.