Dye Easter Eggs with Culinary Materials

By  Susan Liechty, HSA President

Easter eggsRemember the fizzy tablets you dropped in the vinegar to dye those vibrantly colored Easter eggs?  Try something new this year. Dye those eggs with all natural products found in your garden or kitchen.  This is a fun project with interesting results; and the kids will love to experiment with the different items.  The environmental issues aside, you won’t be using artificial dye to transform the eggs into beautiful masterpieces.

The process works as follows:

Hard boil your white eggs (white eggs have a truer dye color). Allow to completely cool and dry.  Next, line up several wide-mouthed empty Mason jars or bowls to fill with all the different colors.  If you use the quart size, you can fit several eggs in one jar.

In a saucepan boil water and place your selected material in the water.  Allow to steep for 10-15 minutes.  Remove from the heat once you’ve reached your desired color and let cool.

Strain out the material, pour into your mason jar and add one tablespoon white vinegar per cup of liquid.  Prepare all colors and line up your jars.  Place your egg(s) in the jar and put in the refrigerator until the color you want has been achieved.  Carefully dry the eggs, put a small amount of oil on the egg and polish with a paper towel.

The results are beautiful and much different than the old standby colors.

Natural materials to try include:

  • Purple cabbage leaves – pink
  • Red onion skins – lavender or red
  • Yellow onion skins – orange or rusty red
  • Coffee grounds – brown
  • Black tea – brown
  • Cayenne pepper – brown
  • Turmeric – yellow
  • Red Zinger tea bags – lavender
  • Beets (diced) – pink
  • Spinach or carrot tops – green
  • Grape Juice – lavender
  • Frozen blueberries – pink
  • Orange peels – light yellow
  • Strong brewed coffee – light brown
  • Cranberries – pink

Remember to store finished eggs in the refrigerator until ready to eat.


The blog for The Herb Society of America is written by members, staff and guest authors, to promote herb appreciation from cultivation and use to learning and research. It supports the Herb Society’s goals to protect botanical heritage, steward scientific diversity and promote personal enjoyment. Membership is open to individuals and businesses.

What herb materials are you using to dye eggs?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s