HSA Webinar: Molé, Pan and Chapulin–Oaxacan Style

by Jen Munson, HSA Education Chair

Face it, 2020, for the most part, has been a bust! The pandemic has cancelled events, reduced travel, and all but eliminated herbal adventures. As we dream of a future where we can begin to move about the globe more easily and safely, now is the perfect time to research new destinations. mapInterestingly, just south of the US border in Mexico there is a unique community that is home to sixteen distinct indigenous peoples living in a mild climate, enjoying unique botanic diversity. 

Oaxaca, Mexico, is a community known for its culture, crafts, textiles, ceramics, cuisine, and complex use of plants. While Mexico is known for its Day of the Dead celebrations, Oaxaca offers the most spiritual and unique Dia de los Muertos Celebrationcelebrations of them all. The Day of the Dead festival (or Dia de los Muertos) is celebrated from October 31st thru November 2nd. During this time, locals believe the gap between our world and the spirit world opens, and loved ones are invited back for a celebration. Offerings are placed on altars in homes, schools, cemeteries, and more. Of course, the spirit world needs nutrition to support their return to the mortal world, so delicious foods play a central role. This melting pot of cultures has created signature dishes including molé (generic for sauces used in Mexican cuisine), pan (an egg based sweet bread made especially for the Day of the Dead), and chapulines (Sphenarium grasshoppers).

Dia de los Muertos panJoin the HSA Webinar series on October 28th at 1pm EDT to celebrate the Day of the Dead with HSA members Sara Holland and Mary Doebbeling as they present, “Molé, Pan, and Chapulin–Oaxacan Style.” A recent journey took them to Oaxaca, Mexico, where they had the opportunity to study and use local herbs and plants. Our webinars are free to members and $5.00 for guests. Become a member today and enjoy all our webinars for free. Visit https://www.herbsociety.org/hsa-learn/hsa-webinars or click here to sign up.

Photo Credits: 1) Enchantedlearning.com; 2) Dia de los Muertos Celebration (Holland/Doebbeling); 3) Pan bread (Holland/Doebbeling).


Sara Holland and Mary Deobbeling

Sara Holland and Mary Doebbeling are active members of the Pioneer Unit, giving local presentations and traveling throughout southwest Texas presenting interesting herbal programs. In addition to being active locally, they have both served as South Central District Membership Delegates and have made contributions to HSA Essential Guides, worked on steering committees for district gatherings, and contributed to various committees including the Research Grant Committee.

HSA Webinar: Hamlet’s Poison: The Mystery of Hebanon & Shakespeare’s Other Deadly Plants

By Jen Munson, HSA Education Chair

‘There’s rosemary, that’s for remembrance; pray, love, remember: and there is pansies. that’s for thoughts.’ (Hamlet 4.5.248)

William Shakespeare’s poetic plays are filled with dramatic imagery and references to plants, herbs, trees, vegetables, and other botanicals. Shakespeare’s awareness of the botanical world was near the level of herbalists of that period, and the use of plants throughout his plays is done with unparalleled sophistication. They are used to enhance ideas and describe characters, as well as for metaphors. For example, Hamlet describes the state of Denmark as “…an unweeded garden / That grows to seed; things rank and gross in nature” (Hamlet 1.22.134-136). 

Plants are used for evil doings and central plot development. They are transformed into potions that are  lust invoking, (Viola tricolor in Midsummer Nights Dream), sleep inducing (Atropa belladonna in Romeo and Juliet), and as poisons for dipping swords and arrows (Hyoscyamus niger in Hamlet). As All Hallows’ Eve approaches, what better time to explore the dark side of botanicals by learning about the many plants cited by Shakespeare. 

Join HSA on October 22nd at 1pm EDT for Hamlet’s Poison: The Mystery of Hebanon & Shakespeare’s Other Deadly Plants, with guest speaker and author Gerit Quealy. During this program Gerit Quealy will take a Law & Order approach to Shakespeare’s poison plants, including what killed Hamlet’s father. The symptoms of the various specimens will be examined, along with the use of forensic evidence, to catch the conscience of the king! Our webinars are free to members and $5.00 for guests. Visit  https://www.herbsociety.org/hsa-learn/hsa-webinars or click here to sign up.


Gerit Quealy is an author, actor, and journalist. Her 2017 publication, Botanical Shakespeare (Harper Design/HarperCollins), reveals Shakespeare’s keen awareness of botany alongside his ability to catapult nature into the land of emotion and metaphor, creating some of the world’s most unforgettable passages. The over 170 flowers, fruits, grains, grasses, trees, herbs, seeds, and vegetables that are named in Shakespeare’s poems and plays, alongside all the lines in which they appear, are highlighted in this unique book. As a journalist, she has covered everything from lipstick to Shakespeare, with pieces ranging from dollhouses to birdhouses to beauty, brownies, and brides in outlets including The New York Times, Country Living, Woman’s Day, and Modern Bride, to name a few.

HSA Webinar: The Chakra System Displayed in a Garden

by Jen Munson, Education Chair

It’s accepted that good health can be found in nature, from the benefits of hands in the dirt to the reduction of stress from a walk in the woods. Another modality for good health is the chakra system. Chakra is Sanskrit for wheel or circle and references the wheels of energy located in the body. The chakra system is a network of energy channels that are mapped throughout the body. Although some may not ascribe to this way of thinking about the body, others embrace a life of learning and exploring this modality.

Join us on September 24th at 1pm EDT for our webinar titled, The Chakra System Displayed in a Garden. Herbalist and business owner Jane Hawley Stevens will be our guest presenter. At Jane’s award-winning organic farm, Four Elements Herbal, she created a garden that organizes plants according to the body systems. Her Chakra Garden has seven distinct areas with plants specific for each body system that help heal and rejuvenate. Learn about this eastern system of healing, the herbs, and the garden design that explains it.

Our webinars are free to members and $5.00 for guests. Visit  https://www.herbsociety.org/hsa-learn/hsa-webinars or click here to sign up. Become a member today and enjoy all of our webinars for free, and as an added bonus, you’ll automatically be entered into a raffle for a free educational conference registration to our 2021 conference being held in Baton Rouge, LA, from April 29th to May 1st, 2021.

In preparation for our upcoming webinar, continue reading to become more familiar with the chakra system. There are seven primary chakras found along the spine starting at the perineum and moving straight up to the top of the head. Each chakra vibrates at a different energy level and reflects a different color and part of the body and its function.

First Chakra – Root – Located at the perineum, this chakra connects us to the earth and is associated with the color red. It entails the spinal column, kidneys, legs, and colon. Plants for this chakra include dandelion root, garlic, parsnips and other root-like herbs.

Second Chakra – Sacral – Located by the sacrum, it’s connected to pleasure and emotional balance. It’s represented by the color orange and is Chakra Image-page-001associated with the reproductive organs, prostate, and bladder. Herbs for this energy channel include calendula, sandalwood, vanilla, carob, fennel, and licorice.

Third Chakra – Navel – Located by the belly button, it is the center of our emotions, including willpower and assertion. With its yellow color it covers the pancreas, liver, and stomach. Plants to support this wheel include celery, rosemary, cinnamon, peppermint, spearmint, turmeric, cumin, and fennel.

Fourth Chakra – Heart – Located centrally near the heart, this chakra represents love, acceptance, forgiveness, compassion, and intuitiveness. The color is green and the associated body systems are heart and the circulatory system. Plants for the fourth chakra include cayenne, lavender, marjoram, rose, basil, sage, and thyme. 

Fifth Chakra – Throat – Located at the throat, it entails communication, self expression, creativity, and truth. The color is blue and the organs associated with it are the thyroid, hypothalamus, throat, and mouth. Plants for this chakra include lemon balm, red clover, eucalyptus, peppermint, sage, salt, and lemongrass.

Sixth Chakra – Third Eye – Located in the center of the brain, this chakra represents wisdom, intuition, and analytical abilities. The color is a deep purple and the associated organs are the pineal gland, nose, ears, and pituitary gland. Herbs to support this energy wheel include mint, jasmine, eyebright, juniper, mugwort, poppy, and rosemary. 

Seventh Chakra – Crown – This chakra is found just above the crown of the head and connects us to divine energy. Its color is light purple, indigo blue, or white. No organs are associated with this energy wheel, and herbs that support this energy center include lavender and lotus flowers.

Photo Credits: 1) Sacred lotus, Nelumbo nucifera (Erin Holden); 2) Chakra system


jane hawley stevensJane Hawley Stevens has been working with herbs, from starting seeds to creating herbal wellness, since 1981. Jane and her husband, David, own and operate a 130-acre certified organic farm in Baraboo Bluffs, Wisconsin. Just this year, Jane and David were named the Midwest Organic & Sustainable Education Service (MOSES) 2020 Organic Farmers of the Year! 

Their farm is also home to Four Elements Organic Herbals. Their property is composed of cultivated fields, prairie, and woodland. Jane believes that healing comes from nature, so dedicates her power to nurturing healing herbs, both cultivated and wild. These are hand harvested at peak potency to create her unique line of remedies. In this rural setting, Jane has contributed her message of honoring nature to schools, civic groups, and through Four Elements’ Annual Open House over the past 30 plus years.

HSA Webinar: A Recipe for Success

By Bevin Cohen

I’ve long been amazed by the generous bounty offered to us by Mother Nature. Even as a young boy picking wintergreen berries in the woods, I just couldn’t believe that these tasty treats were available for me to enjoy, in quantities greater than I could ever consume, and the only cost was an afternoon in the shady forest, harvesting the luscious fruits as I listened to the melodious whistling of the birds and the occasional scurried sounds of a startled chipmunk or squirrel. 

As an adult, my appreciation for Nature’s endless gifts has only deepened, and I find IMG_1408myself preaching her message of abundance to anyone willing to listen. Through my work as an author, herbalist, and educator, I’ve been placed in a unique position to share my knowledge, experiences, and passion with audiences the world over, and the core of my message has always remained the same: Mother Nature provides for our every need. But we must first take the time to learn her language and then follow her advice.  

Just shy of a decade ago, my wife, Heather, and I founded Small House Farm, a sustainable homestead project in central Michigan. As a practicing herbalist, I felt that this venture was the perfect opportunity to continue promoting my ideology of Nature’s abundance and localized living. The salves, balms, tinctures, and teas that we offer are purposely crafted using only herbs grown in our gardens or harvested from the wild. Additionally, we have taken on the task of producing our own seed and nut oils through cold pressed, expeller extraction for all of our product lines. It’s through this direct relationship with our ingredients that we are able to create products that are not only potent and useful but that also reflect our value and commitment to localized sustainability. Just as the sommelier believes that the terroir of the grapes is reflected in the quality of the wine, at Small House we believe that our locally sourced ingredients are the recipe for success.

Please join me on Thursday, August 20th, at 1pm EDT for an Herb Society of America webinar entitled “Wildcrafted Herbs and Fresh Pressed Oils: How Locally Sourced ArtisanHerbalist_CatIngredients are a Recipe for Success.”  During this presentation, I’ll be discussing the value of locally sourced herbs from one’s own bioregion and the multitude of herbal allies available to us in our nearby parks, fields, and forests. I’ll also share my thoughts on do-it-yourself seed and nut oil production for use in herbal formulas, drawing on my years of experience with small-scale commercial production and sale of various oils including hempseed, sunflower, almond, flax, and pumpkin seed. 

Those joining us for the webinar will receive an exclusive coupon code for a 15% discount off the cover price of my 2019 bestselling book, Saving Our Seeds, as well as a unique link to preorder my upcoming book The Artisan Herbalist: Making Teas, Tinctures and Oils at Home (New Society ’21).

Webinars are free to Herb Society of America members and $5.00 for guests. Visit https://www.herbsociety.org/hsa-learn/hsa-webinars or click here to sign up. Become a member today, and enjoy all of our webinars for free, and as an added bonus, you’ll automatically be entered into a raffle for a free educational conference registration to our 2021 conference being held in Baton Rouge, LA, from April 29th – May 1st, 2021.

Photos courtesy of the author.


BevinCohenBevin Cohen is an author, herbalist, gardener, seed saver, educator, and owner of Small House Farm in Michigan. Cohen offers workshops and lectures across the country on the benefits of living closer to the land through seeds, herbs, and locally grown food, and he has published numerous works on these topics, including the bestselling Saving Our Seeds and his highly anticipated new book, The Artisan Herbalist (New Society ’21). He serves on the board of the International Herb Association and the advisory council for the Community Seed Network. Learn more about Cohen’s work on his website  www.smallhousefarm.com 

HSA Webinar: How to Grow and Use Lavender for Health and Beauty

By Jen Munson, Education Chair

A program I attended a few years back labeled basil the “King of Herbs,” but in my world, lavender is the true king. From its medicinal benefits to its culinary and craft uses, lavender can’t be beat. The fresh clean scent of lavender has been used in cosmetics and skin care products since ancient times. It smells good, improves circulation, attracts pollinators, and promotes sleep. With over twenty five different varieties, there is likely a lavender variety you can grow not only for its beauty, but for its many uses. 

Join us for our webinar on July 21st at 1pm EST with author Janice Cox when she presents “How to Grow and Use Lavender for Health and Beauty.” Learn how to start a new plant from cuttings, air-dry flowers for year round use, and create your own DIY body care products that can be used for hair care, skin care, and in the bath. Tips, recipes, and herbal craft ideas will be shared throughout this dynamic webinar.  

As an additional bonus, HSA Members can receive 20% off, plus free shipping, on Janice’s latest book, Beautiful Lavender (Ogden 2020). This book is filled with lavender recipes and ideas. Log into the member only area of the HSA website to obtain the code, then go to Janice’s website at http://www.naturabeautyathome.com to order the book. The book retails for $17.99, but for HSA members, it is $14.39 + free shipping!

Our webinars are free to members and $5.00 for guests. Visit https://www.herbsociety.org/hsa-learn/hsa-webinars or click here to sign up. Become a member today, and enjoy all of our webinars for free, and as an added bonus, you’ll automatically be entered into a raffle for a free educational conference registration to our 2021 conference being held in Baton Rouge, LA, from April 29th – May 1st, 2021.

About Janice Cox

Janice Cox is an expert on the topic of natural beauty and making your own cosmetic products with simple kitchen and garden ingredients. She is the author of three best-selling books on the topic: Natural Beauty at Home, Natural Beauty for All Seasons, and Natural Beauty from the Garden. She is currently the beauty editor for Herb Quarterly Magazine, is a member of the editorial advisory board for Mother Earth Living Magazine, and is a member of The Herb Society of America, International Herb Association, United States Lavender Growers Association, Oregon Lavender Association, and Garden Communicators International. 

HSA Webinar: The Game of the Name: Taxonomy and Nomenclature Explained

By Jen Munson, Education Chair

Linneaus for BlogWhen I first joined The Herb Society of America (HSA), it was a struggle to distinguish between parsley, thyme, basil, dill, and pretty much all of the common culinary herbs outside of mint. On top of that, I couldn’t tell you what herbs paired best with what foods. Once I had reached some stable grounds on the basics, my HSA friends then started throwing botanical names at me and their importance. It was then that I wanted to run screaming into the streets in confusion. 

If you identify at all with my confusion–or even if you don’t–plan on attending the upcoming HSA Webinar titled, “The Game of the Name: Taxonomy and Nomenclature Explained” with  garden writer, speaker, and educator Debra Knapke. This webinar is being held on Thursday, June 18, 2020, at 1pm EST. During the webinar, Debra will delve into the complex world of nature and help navigate the troubled waters of plant relationships and plant names. In this session, she will help make sense of two systems that, at their hearts, are simple and logical. 

Our webinars are free to members and $5.00 for guests. Visit https://www.herbsociety.org/hsa-learn/hsa-webinars or click here to sign up. Become a member today and enjoy all of our webinars for free. You’ll also be entered into a raffle for a free educational conference registration to our 2021 conference being held in Baton Rouge, LA, from April 29th – May 1st, 2021.

About Debra Knapke

Debra KnapkeThere is nothing Debra Knapke loves more than inspiring people to get out and garden in an eco-conscious way. Known as “The Garden Sage,” Debra is a popular speaker at professional symposia, as well as gardening events throughout the Midwest. She is active with several professional organizations and served as the Honorary President of The Herb Society of America from 2014-2016. Debra has written five books, numerous articles and blogs on Heartland Gardening, has mentored the future of the landscape industry at Columbus State Community College for 24 years, provides garden design consulting in her spare time, and has crammed an amazing variety of perennials, trees, shrubs, and edibles into the 2/3-acre lot surrounding her home.


Jen Munson is The Herb Society of America’s Education Chair. She discovered herbs when she stumbled upon her local unit’s herb and plant sale and hasn’t looked back since. Just recently, she celebrated being a member of the NorthEast Seacoast Unit for 15 years!

HSA Webinar: The Brambles: Sorting through the Thicket of Rubus Terminology

By Jen Munson, Education Chair

Brambles…hmmm…Rubus: The International Herb Association’s (IHA) Herb of the Year™ 2020…hmmm, not necessarily a tactile herb you want to scratch and sniff, or roll between your fingers to enjoy. Regardless, it is one that definitely evokes vivid memories. Growing up we had a red raspberry patch, and it was so exciting to collect raspberries for pies, pancakes, cakes, muffins, or just to enjoy fresh. Picking raspberries always came with an “owiee” as you undoubtedly hit one of the thorns. raspberry-2023404_1920

As an adult, I have memories of my dog running out of a briar patch with a smile on his face and blood all over as he nicked his ears on the thorns. If you are familiar with how much a dog’s ears can bleed, you’ll know what I am talking about. Despite the physical memories, Rubus in its many varieties can produce the most delicious tasting fruit second only to blueberries for me. Between the beautiful colors, natural sweetness, and culinary flexibility, there is no denying that Rubus is worthy of being IHA’s Herb of the Year™ 2020.

To learn what other HSA members are saying about Rubus, download our Essential Guide, or better yet, visit https://www.herbsociety.org/hsa-learn/hsa-webinars/ or click here to sign up for our upcoming May 21st webinar titled The Brambles: Sorting through the Thicket of Rubus Terminology with Honorary Herb Society of America President Susan Belsinger.  

Our webinars are free to members and $5.00 for guests. Become a member between May 1, 2020, and January 31, 2021, and not only will you be able to attend our webinars for free, you’ll be entered into a raffle for a free registration to our educational conference being held in Baton Rouge, LA from April 29, 2021 to May 1, 2021.

Susan Belsinger, HSA Honorary President

1-Susan BelsingerSusan Belsinger lives an herbal life, whether she is gardening, foraging, photographing, teaching, researching, writing or creating herbal recipes for the kitchen or apothecary—she is passionate about all things herbal. Recently referred to as a “flavor artist”, Susan delights in kitchen alchemy—the blending of harmonious foods, herbs, and spices—to create real, delicious food, as well as libations, that nourish our bodies and spirits and titillate our senses. Susan is a culinary herbalist, educator, food writer, and photographer whose articles and photographs have been published in numerous publications including The Herb Companion, The Herbarist, Herbs for Health, Mother Earth Living, Natural Home & Garden, and Fine Gardening, among many others.


Jen Munson is The Herb Society of America’s Education Chair. She discovered herbs when she stumbled upon her local unit’s herb and plant sale and hasn’t looked back since. Just recently she celebrated being a member of the NorthEast Seacoast Unit for 15 years!

HSA Webinar: Macrofungi – The Basics of Mushrooms

By Jen Munson, HSA Education Chair

chanterelle mushrooms - most popular of edible varieties

Chanterelles, a popular edible mushroom

For many people, mushrooms, lichen, and other fungi are exotic forest species. For the amateur, they are difficult to recognize by name, while for those seeking to harvest them, identification is overwhelming. Unlike traditional herbs and plants that can be grown from seed, examined in botanical gardens, or readily studied in books, mushroom knowledge can be difficult to cultivate. They appear at intermittent times in the forest or in your lawn, and require a delicate balance of weather, mycorrhiza (i.e. that symbiotic relationship between fungi and plants and trees) in the soil, and underground relationships with other organisms. All of these added together can challenge even the most adventurous gardeners.

The thought of studying and learning to identify mushrooms is overwhelming on the best of days. At one time, mushrooms were classified in the plant kingdom because they grow out of the soil and have rigid walls; however, they contain no chlorophyll and therefore, don’t photosynthesize, so were moved to the realm of the fungal kingdom. There are over 10,000 known types of mushrooms, and mycologists suspect that this is only a fraction of what is growing in the world. 

To start your foray into the world of mushrooms, join The Herb Society on April 16th at 1pm EDT for our webinar, “Macrofungi – The Basics of Mushrooms” with Jay Justice, a noted mycologist.

Jay JusticeJay Justice is a retired state epidemiologist from Arkansas, and for over 40 years has studied the macrofungi that can be found in the Southern and Southeastern regions of the United States. He is a co-founder and scientific advisor for the Arkansas Mycological Society (1982) and a scientific advisor to the Cumberland Mycological Society, as well as a chief mycologist for the Missouri Mycological Society. In past years, he participated in several conferences associated with the study of the macrofungi that occur in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina.

He has given presentations and served as a field mycologist at conferences sponsored by the following mycological societies: the Gulf States Mycological Society, the Missouri Mycological Society, the Texas Mycological Society, the Mushroom Club of Georgia, the Asheville Mushroom Club, the New Mexico Mycological Society, and the Los Angeles Mycological Society. In 2011, he was the recipient of the “Gary Lincoff Award for Contributions to Amateur Mycology” award, which is a yearly award given out by the North American Mycological Association. Jay has a special affection for the genus Amanita, along with chanterelles and the members of the fleshy poroid fungi known as boletes.
Plan to join Jay and The Herb Society on April 16th at 1:00 PM EDT for this unique and interesting opportunity to learn about mushrooms. The webinar is free to The Herb Society of America members. It is only $5.00 for non-members. which will be applied to the cost of membership when joining The Society. Visit https://www.herbsociety.org/hsa-learn/hsa-webinars/ or click here to register. 


Jen Munson is The Herb Society of America’s Education Chair. She discovered herbs when she stumbled upon her local unit’s herb and plant sale and hasn’t looked back since. Just recently she celebrated being a member of the NorthEast Seacoast Unit for 15 years!

HSA Webinar: Growing and Using Herbs of the Southwestern Missions

Author Jacqueline Soule will be presenting this month’s webinar on Wed, March 25 at 1pm – click here to register. This article is excerpted from her book, Father Kino’s Herbs: Growing and Using Them Today.

Epazote – An Efficacious ‘Erbcover kino

By Dr. Jacqueline A. Soule

Did you know that you can speak at least one word of Nahuatl, the language spoken in Mexico pre-conquest? Epazote is the Nahuatl name for Dysphania ambrosioides (formerly Chenopodium ambrosioides). English common names include wormseed, Jesuit tea, American wormseed, Mexican tea, and Jerusalem oak.

By the time of contact between the New and Old Worlds, epazote had been cultivated for well over a thousand years in southern and southeast coastal Mexico.  It was, and still is, a principal flavoring for a large number of Yucatan and Veracruz dishes and is indispensable for cooking black beans.

Epazote in Cooking

Like the Old World herbs cumin and ginger, epazote has the unique ability to help break down hard-to-digest vegetable proteins. These difficult proteins are found most often in beans, peas, and members of the cabbage family. A few leaves of epazote cooked in the pot with the potential offender can go a long way towards rendering the bean proteins, well, shall we say, “ungaseous.”

epazote 4631088290 wiki cc 2.0Epazote was popular on the coast and in warmer climates of the Aztec and Mayan areas but had also made its way into Central Mexico and the Aztec National Botanical Gardens. It was traded in the marketplace of Tenochtitlan in the 1530s.  The most popular culinary uses were to cook it with beans, nopales (prickly pear cactus pads), and fish dishes.

Epazote in Medicine

Ethnomedicinally, epazote has been used in a decoction as a vermifuge (against intestinal worms) and in an infusion to help induce labor, reduce menstrual cramps, and as a general post-partum tonic. It is also used in the treatment of amenorrhea, dysmenorrhea, malaria, chorea, hysteria, catarrh, and asthma. Oil of chenopodium is derived from epazote and is a proven anthelmintic, that is, it kills intestinal worms, and was once listed for this use in the U.S. Pharmacopeia. It is also cited as an antispasmodic.

Medicinals on Migration

Epazote was brought northward into the Southwest United States primarily by natives resettled into the region by Spanish decree. It is recorded as planted in the herb gardens at San Xavier del Bac Mission (outside Tucson, Arizona) in 1752.  Epazote found its way into eastern North America and Canada. It was a popular vermifuge as its effects were more predictable and less violent than European wormwood (Artemisia absinthium). There are no reports of Yankees using it for culinary purposes.

Planting and Careepazote NRCS wiki cc 0.0 PD

Plant epazote from seed in spring once night temperatures rise above the low 50s. You can also start indoors and transplant once danger of frost is past. Seeds can take as long as four weeks to germinate. Plants will thrive through the warm season and freeze to the ground at 35℉, but often regrow from the roots. At 20℉, the roots will be killed as well.

Epazote plants do well in full sun, but some afternoon shade is appreciated in the Southwest by this tropical herb. Soil can be poor, even clay, but plants grow best in average, well-drained soils. Epazote can be grown in containers that are at least twelve inches deep.

Epazote can reach five feet tall, but at that height, it will be scraggly and unattractive. Pinch epazote plants often, especially the central branches, to keep it around two to three feet tall, compact, leafy, and with an appealing form in the garden. Usually a single plant epazote AMP 1902139 web cropprovides enough herbage for a household.

Epazote reseeds readily, so pinch off the seed stalks, or be ready to ruthlessly weed out excess plants the following spring. On the other hand, seed heads turn an attractive bronze in autumn, and the lesser goldfinches enjoy the seeds. Ideally, find a less-used corner of the garden for epazote where, if seeds spread, they will not be a major problem. A strongly scented herb, epazote is reported as a deer repellent, and I can report that javalina, jackrabbits, and cottontails avoid eating the plants.

Harvesting and Use

Epazote is best used fresh for culinary purposes. Chop or mince leaves and add early to dishes that require long cooking, like beans, roasts, soups, or stews. Use one tablespoon minced leaves per cup of beans or to a two pound roast. Do not use it as a garnish since the taste is bitter. If not fresh, frozen epazote may be used as a culinary herb. In my tests, epazote does not have the same “digestive” effect after drying.

Medicinal Disclaimer: It is the policy of The Herb Society of America, Inc. not to advise or recommend herbs for medicinal or health use. This information is intended for educational purposes only and should not be considered as a recommendation or an endorsement of any particular medical or health treatment. Please consult a health care provider before pursuing any herbal treatments.


Jacqueline Soule business portrait. Tucson, AZ. © 2012 Mark Turner

Jacqueline Soule Tucson, AZ. © 2012 Mark Turner

Jacqueline writes about gardening for a living. It’s a job she does in two very different USDA zones – 10 and 4. Nine months of the year she lives on an acre in the Tucson Mountains, and 3 months on an acre in Vermont. In both places she happily grows numerous herbs because they are about the only plant the local critters will not munch to the ground.

© copyright Jacqueline A. Soule. This article is excerpted from Father Kino’s Herbs: Growing and Using Them Today written by the author. All rights reserved. You must ask permission to republish an entire blog post or article. You can use a short excerpt, but you must give proper credit, plus you must include a link back to the original post on our site. No stealing photos. To purchase this and other books by Jacqueline Soule, visit her website.

HSA Webinar: Texas Tough Herbs

By Jen Munson, Education Chair

texas tough

Texas is so large that growing zones can vary from one part of the state to the other. Northern Texas is zone 6B, while much of the remainder of the state varies from zone 7a to 9a. Join us on Wednesday, January 22nd, at 1pm EDT when HSA Member, Gayle Southerland, returns to the HSA Webinar series on an exploration of “Texas Tough Herbs.” She will discuss plants that thrive in the extremes of hot Texas summers and droughts while surviving freezing winters, too. Even if you are not in Texas, you will expand your garden knowledge and will be inspired to experiment with some lesser- known plant varieties to trial in your own garden. Sign up for this webinar on the HSA website.

Gayle Southerland_Texas Tough WebinarGayle became interested in herbs when she and her husband, Rick, bought their first house and had room to garden. Gayle has been a member of the Herb Society of America for over 30 years. She has served in many capacities from being the chair of the North Texas Unit to participating on The Herbarist committee, HSA’s yearly publication. Gayle has given presentations for The Herb Society of America national, district, and local meetings, as well as to local master gardener groups, Dallas MakerSpace, and various other garden clubs.


Jen Munson is The Herb Society of America’s Education Chair. She discovered herbs when she stumbled upon her local unit’s herb and plant sale and hasn’t looked back since. Just recently she celebrated being a member of the NorthEast Seacoast Unit for 15 years!