Hearty and Herby Corn Chowder

By Gladys McKinneycorn chowder

During the fall when I have run myself down with all the pumpkin recipes, I look forward to this comfort food chowder. So often we forget the beauty of all the harvest vegetables when pumpkin time comes around, so I thought it fair to mention some other vegetables left behind in the rush-in of fall and all the autumn colors.

Parsley is the main herb in this chowder recipe. It is an herb that is packed with vitamin C, a vitamin that is important for our immune system and overall health.  So, at a time of year when the sun starts to set early and rise late, it is one of the handy herbs to help boost our immune system when we need it most.

This chowder is a long-time friend of late evenings with a good book. Enjoy!

Herbed Corn Chowdercorn chowder herbs

  • 1/4 cup of butter
  • 1/2 cup of onions
  • 1/4 cup of shallots
  • 1/4 cup of flour
  • 1 quart of half and half cream
  • 3 cans of creamed corn
  • 1 can of sweet corn
  • 2 cups of cheddar cheese
  • ¼ cup parsley
  • 1 teaspoon of thyme
  • Smoked pepper, salt, paprika, hot pepper flakes to taste

Put butter, onions and shallots into a skillet (I use a cast iron pan). Cook this until the onions just start to caramelize and then add the flour. Fork-stir this until no lumps are in the pan and it is smooth. In a separate pan on the stove or in a bowl in the microwave, warm up the half and half and add this to the onion mixture and stir well until smooth. Add the cans of corn, stirring constantly; add the cheese next. As the mixture heats, add your parsley, thyme, smoked pepper, and salt to taste.

When done, put into soup bowls and top with a few hot pepper flakes and sprinkle with paprika. I serve this with a nice crusty bread or corn bread.


Gladys McKinney is treasurer of The Herb Society of America.  She lives in Villas, New Jersey. Gladys says that she enjoys this chowder at the shoreline of Cape May in the fall with her children.

Every Community Needs a Seed Library

by Bevin Cohen

seed catalog

Community seed sharing programs bring people together. So many times, as I’ve stood in front of a crowd at a seed library opening or other similar event, I’ve looked out among the faces and been amazed at the sheer diversity of people in the room: people of all ages, ethnicities, and gender. Seeds are truly a part of everyone’s story; without seeds we simply cannot survive. And with each passing year it seems that more and more people are realizing this and returning to the Earth, to the seeds that feed us all.

When people talk of saving seeds, inevitably they mention the importance of preserving genetic diversity. While genetic and historic preservation, adaptability, and self-reliance are all important aspects of the seed saving movement, it’s community building that is the foundation on which the entire movement stands.

As the movement toward increased food security and localized diet continues to grow, local control of our seed supply is a topic of significant relevance. One of the fastest growing facets of this movement is the seed library, a place where community members have access to a selection of seeds that they can “check-out” just like you would books from your public library. In fact, a number of these programs are actually housed within a local library. I always like to joke that if you want to see a librarian get excited just give them a new reason to use those old card catalogs! There is certainly something beautiful about those old drawers filled with packets of seeds eagerly awaiting a gardener to take them home and give them a grow!

To continue with the library book analogy, after a gardener checks out their seeds and takes them home, when the fall harvest is complete, participants are encouraged to bring their seeds back to the library to restock the supply. If properly executed, the seed library can become a closed circuit sustainable program offering its community a wide selection of regionally adapted, local seed. But it’s this part of the program that has proven to be the most challenging.  The general consensus among the directors of these programs is that getting community members to return seed at the end of the season is the most difficult challenge they face every year.

In my eyes one of the most beneficial aspects of a seed library is its ability to strengthen a community. When like-minded people gather together for a common cause, the friendships and relationships that develop have a value that’s far too great to measure. If a seed library’s sole accomplishment was to get people talking to their neighbors again, sharing seeds and recipes or even just their surplus zucchini, I would consider that a win. But what a seed library offers is also so much more.

Seed libraries are on the forefront of the local food movement, empowering communities with the tools and skills they need to regain the independence we must have in order to live happy and healthy lives. Every neighborhood deserves access to locally grown and adapted seed; every neighborhood should be home to a community seed library program.

 –an excerpt from the book ‘From Our Seeds & Their Keepers; a collection of stories”


Here is how you can start a seed saving library in your community.

Step 1: Consider contacting your local library and if they don’t already have a seed library in place, maybe it’s time for you to plant that seed.

Step 2: Many hands make light work. Connect with like-minded community members to form your seed library working group. Consider Master Gardeners, community gardens, your local herb society and other similar organizations.

Step 3: Time to gather your seeds! Many seed companies are willing to donate to community gardening programs. Reach out to them and make contact. The best time to solicit seed donations is in the winter when companies are hoping to clear out the previous year’s stock.

Step 4: Decide how your community seed library will organize and distribute your seeds. Will participants need to sign up and become members of your seed library? Or will your library be more of a “hands-off” give and take freestyle program? You’ll need to assess your community’s needs as well as your seed library’s resources to determine what the best fit is for your program.

Step 5: Budget for success! While you may be able to acquire your initial seed stock for free, there will be other small expenses you may incur during the setup phase, such as envelopes, labels etc. Plan accordingly!

Step 6: Have fun! Sharing seeds and stories is a fun and healthy way to support your community. Local seeds grow local food and healthy communities are happy communities! Together we can make the world a better place, one seed at a time.


Learn more about seed libraries and Bevin’s work at www.smallhousefarm.com

Bevin has published two books on the subject of seed saving:

From Our Seeds & Their Keeper; a collection of Stories, Small House Press, 2018

Saving Our Seeds: the Practice & Philosophy, Small House, Press 2019

Both titles are available via Amazon or directly from the author at www.smallhousefarm.com

 

 

 

The Herbs and Spices of Thanksgiving!

By Susan Leigh AnthonyHappy Thanksgiving

If we are lucky enough, most, if not all, of us have sat down to an annual Thanksgiving feast with our loved ones in late November.  The house is filled with familiar aromas of the season that evoke a sense of warmth, coziness, and well-being. It is the ultimate comfort food meal!

Without the herbs and spices we associate with our traditional Thanksgiving spread the food would be rather dull.  What would the turkey be without incorporating sage (Salvia officinalis) in our stuffing?  Cinnamon is a must-have for apple pie.  For pumpkin pie we need cinnamon, ginger, and nutmeg. And I’d rather not drink my eggnog without a dash of freshly ground nutmeg. Many of us use the familiar Old Bay Poultry seasoning and often, along with sage, this herb and spice mix also includes nutmeg, thyme, marjoram, rosemary, and black pepper.

Kate Erd, manager of the Spice House on Old World 3rd Street in Milwaukee explains that “Herbs are the leafy part of the plant, like sage leaves, rosemary needles, and parsley.” “Spices are the hard part of the plant, so it’s the bark or the seed or the root. For example, cinnamon is bark, nutmeg is a seed, and ginger is a rhizome. Spices only grow about 15 degrees above and below the equator, where herbs, on the other hand, can be grown anywhere.” Erd says. “We grow them here in the Northern Hemisphere. There are some exceptions,” she adds. “Coriander and dill seed are spices from plants that are grown as herbs — cilantro in the case of coriander.”

Often, “pumpkin pie spice contains cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger, mace, cloves, and allspice, and sometimes buds from the cassia tree from which cinnamon is produced.”

Below are three Thanksgiving recipes that I’ve made for years, which have now become a tradition in my family. And here is a great site with wonderful recipes to try as well.  https://theherbalacademy.com/12-herbal-thanksgiving-dinner-recipes/

Creamed Onions with White Wine and Herbs

  • 2 pounds small white boiling onions, peeled (you can use frozen– much easier!)
  • 1 (750 milliliter) bottle decent Chardonnay wine
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
  • salt to taste
  • 1 teaspoon butter
  • 1 cup heavy whipping cream

Place onions in a 2-quart pot. Pour enough wine to cover half of the onions. Add the bay leaf, thyme, and salt. Simmer and stir for 25 minutes. Add the cream and bring to a boil; reduce heat and cook until thickened. Remove from heat and stir in the butter. Remove bay leaf and serve.

Adapted from Allrecipes.com

Cranberry Chutney

Makes about 4 ½ cups (Note–Makes the whole house smell wonderful– it’s a joy to make)

  • 2 oranges
  • 1 pound fresh cranberries, washed
  • 6 ounces dried cranberries
  • 8 ounces dried cherries
  • 3 or 4 cinnamon sticks
  • 4 good sized garlic cloves, minced well
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh ginger
  • ¼ cup packed dark brown sugar
  • ¼ cup balsamic vinegar
  • ½ cup apple cider

Remove the zest of the oranges (a vegetable peeler works very well!) Cut the zest into fine julienne, and set aside a small amount to use later for garnish. Juice the oranges. Using a large non-reactive pot, combine all ingredients (except a few reserved orange juliennes) and give a good stir. Simmer the mixture for 25- 30 minutes over a medium /low heat, stirring occasionally, until all the liquid is evaporated and the chutney is thickened. You can garnish the finished chutney with the cinnamon sticks and reserved zest. Cool well before storing. I have found this freezes quite well in small batches.

Adapted from The Martha Stewart Cookbook : Collected Recipes for Every Day

 

Lemon – Ginger Cheesecake

12 TO 14 SERVINGS

CRUST

  • 2 cups finely ground gingersnap cookies (about 9 ounces)
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1/4 cup (1/2 stick) unsalted butter, melted

FILLING

  • 4 8-ounce packages cream cheese, room temperature
  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 4 large eggs, room temperature
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1/2 cup whipping cream
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped crystallized ginger
  • 2 tablespoons finely grated peeled fresh ginger
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 4 teaspoons grated lemon peel
  • Lemon slices (for garnish)

FOR CRUST: Preheat oven to 325°F. Generously butter a 10-inch-diameter springform pan with 2 and  3/4-inch-high sides. Double-wrap outside of pan with heavy-duty foil. Blend ground cookies, sugar, and ginger in food processor. Add melted butter and process until moist crumbs form. Press mixture onto bottom and 1/2 inch up sides of prepared pan. Bake until crust sets, about 10 minutes. Cool. Maintain oven temperature.

FOR FlLLING: Using an electric mixer, beat cream cheese in large bowl until fluffy. Beat in sugar, scraping down sides of bowl occasionally. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in sour cream and whipping cream, then crystallized ginger, fresh ginger, lemon juice, and lemon peel. Pour filling into crust. Place springform pan in large roasting pan. Pour enough boiling water into roasting pan to come one inch up sides of springform pan. Bake cheesecake until filling is set and golden brown on top (cake will rise slightly above edge of pan), about 1 hour 25 minutes. Turn off oven and prop open oven door with wooden spoon. Let cake stand in oven one hour (cake will fall).

Remove springform pan from water bath. Remove foil and cool cheesecake completely on rack. Cover and refrigerate overnight. (Can be prepared ahead and refrigerated four days or frozen up to two months.) Defrost frozen cake overnight in refrigerator.) Release pan sides from cheesecake. Transfer cheesecake to platter. Arrange lemon slices decoratively around cake and serve.

TEST KITCHEN TIP: Use a processor to grind the gingersnap cookies finely for the crust. Adapted from Epicurious


 Susan Leigh Anthony is a longtime member of the New England Unit of HSA. She runs a garden design business named Doveflower Cottage and is a perennial buyer and expert at Kennedy’s Country Gardens in Scituate, MA.

 

Sage: The Herb of Thanksgiving

By Susan Belsinger

“Sage soothes both youth and age and brings the cook pleasing praise.”                                    Carolyn Dille & Susan Belsinger, Herbs in the Kitchen

The majority of recipes that we find for stuffing (cooked inside the turkey or other fowl) or dressing (generally cooked separately in a baking dish in the oven), use fresh or dried sage leaves for flavoring, whether the ingredients include sausage, oysters, mushrooms, nuts, dried fruit, traditional white breadcrumbs or cornbread. Besides its traditional uses with poultry, game, and liver, and in sausages, sage can add a rich and graceful note to vegetables, breads, and sweets.

Sage’s culinary use with rich dishes probably came from its reputation as a digestive. It was very highly held as a medicinal plant by the Greeks and Romans. Its principal use was as a calmative for the stomach and nerves. Regular use of sage tea was said to confer an even disposition to excitable natures and a healthy old age to everyone. Swiss peasants and American Indians used sage as a dentifrice, first chewing a few leaves, then brushing the gums with a twig.

Sage is much respected culinarily in England and Italy, where most country gardens have a sage bush, often fifteen years or older. The flavor from good sage stock does not deteriorate with age, however sage varies in flavor as much as some of the more delicate herbs, depending on the soil and weather conditions. Dalmatian sage from Yugoslavia is esteemed because the camphor odor is less pronounced than in sage grown in different climates. This aroma is also milder in the fresh leaf. The flavor of fresh sage has decidedly lemon rind tones over resin. The lemon flavor recedes and the camphor, and a pleasant muskiness similar to silage, comes forward when sage is dried.

Common sage (Salvia officinalis) seems to keep its aroma and flavor through cooking and drying. Dwarf sage ‘Nana’, white-flowered sage ‘Alba’, and purple-leaved sage ‘Purpurescens’ and the wide-leaved, German ‘Berggarten’ are all handsome varieties of common sage, with good flavor and aroma. The latter cultivar is very strong in flavor, so a smaller amount should be used in place of common sage.

Sage–it’s not just for turkey!

Tis the season for sage—so harvest and dry it—or bring it into the kitchen and get creative with your salvias! Here are just a few ways to use this cold-weather herb in warming winter dishes:

Turkey stuffing—I particularly like it baked in my cornbread, which I bake ahead and then crumble and let it dry out a bit.

Winter squash baked with sage, garlic, and drizzled with olive oil.

Oven-roasted root vegetables (potatoes, sweet potatoes, rutabaga, parsnips, turnips, leeks, and onions) diced and baked in a hot oven with sage leaves and olive oil, perhaps sprinkled with some ancho chile powder or smoked paprika.

Pinto, black, red and white beans are much improved by the flavor of sage and it works well with green chiles.

Pasta e fagioli wouldn’t be the most delectable pasta and bean soup without sage.

Hearty stews, cassoulet and chili benefit from sage seasoning, not to mention its antioxidant properties.

Both risotto and pasta are wonderful when combined with winter squash, sage leaves, and toasted nuts.scones pumpkin cranberries

Try fresh sage leaves in your biscuits or pumpkin scones.

Combine sliced sweet potatoes, apple slices, and onions (or not) in the crockpot with sage leaves and drizzle with a little maple syrup and add a few knobs of butter. Serve when meltingly tender garnished with toasted pecans.

My favorite seasonal fruits—apples and pears—are delightful with sage from sage apple cake, pear, and cranberry crumble to applesauce.

Sage honey is great for sore throats and coughs—taken by the spoonful or added to a cup of hot tea—I have some infusing now in local honey.

Cultivating Sage

Sage graces the garden with its soft grey-green foliage providing a pleasing contrast to the bright hues of most other culinary herbs. It will grow to a bush about four feet in diameter, keeping a well-rounded shape with little pruning in mild climates. All of the sages should have a well-drained or gravelly soil and some added calcium where it is lacking in the soil. Sage needs full sun and will survive through cold winters if well mulched. It should be pruned in the early spring to encourage new growth.

A good practice to follow is mulching sage with an inch or two of sand. That, and the careful sanitation of removing weeds and dead leaves will usually suffice to spare the plants from the soil-borne wilt diseases to which they are susceptible.

Harvesting and Drying Sagesage drying

Like most herbs, sage should be dried in a warm dry place away from sun. Once the leaves are completely dried they should be stored whole in airtight containers. Sage should be crumbled, never ground, as needed for cooking; grinding completely destroys the delicate lemony perfume and leaves the harsher resinous flavors.


Susan is a culinary herbalist, food writer, educator, and photograph whose work has been published in numerous publications. She has authored a number of award-winning books. Her latest book, The Culinary Herbal: Growing & Preserving 97 Flavorful Herbs was co-authored with the late Dr. Arthur Tucker.

Susan is passionate about herbs and her work, sharing the joy of gardening and cooking through teaching & writing, and inspiring others to get in touch with their senses of smell & taste.

Nutmeg – The Rest of the Story

By Maryann Readal

November2019 HOM Nutmeg

Nutmeg is that spice we use in pumpkin and apple pie and sprinkle on our lattes and eggnog during the holidays.  It is also the spice that we use in béchamel and alfredo sauces and is an ingredient in garam masala and curry.  Its medicinal uses include treatment for diarrhea and gas and a topical treatment for pain. In the mid 1300’s it was thought to combat the Black Death. Eaten in very large doses, nutmeg can cause severe hallucinations which have an unpleasant after effect compared to a two-day hangover. Not to worry, culinary doses of nutmeg are very far from the doses needed to achieve unpleasant results.

The Herb Society of America’s Herb of the Month for November is nutmeg. Nutmeg is made from the seed of the nutmeg tree, Myristica fragrans. The outer lace-like covering of the nutmeg seed is dried and ground and that spice is mace. The tree is a native of the Banda Islands in Indonesia. For more information, a beautiful screensaver, and recipes using nutmeg, go to The Herb Society’s Herb of the Month webpage.

The spice trade began in the Middle East more than 4,000 years ago, when Chinese, Persian, Malay, and Arab traders brought spices to Europe. Nutmeg was prized by the European aristocracy who used it for seasoning, medicine, and to preserve meat. Ladies wore nutmeg sachets around their necks and men put it into their snuff. Everyone used it to combat the plague.

European traders began to search for the source of nutmeg and other valuable spices and thus began an era of world exploration. Christopher Columbus was on a search for the origin of spices when he accidentally found America instead.

Now, here is the rest of the story. In 1667, the Dutch traded Manhattan to the British for a small Pacific island named Run.  Run was one of the Banda Islands in the Spice Islands archipelago and was where the nutmeg trees grew. Why did the Dutch do this? They wanted to control the nutmeg trade. At that time, nutmeg was worth more than gold and whoever had the Banda Islands, the only place where it grew, had a monopoly on the spice. The Dutch wanted total control of the lucrative nutmeg trade and they were willing to give up New Amsterdam (Manhattan), their backwater town in the New World for it. Local Bandanese call this trade the “Manhattan Transfer.” The years of war between the Dutch and the English over control of the Banda Islands were called the Nutmeg Wars. These wars were devastating and cruel for the inhabitants of the islands.

As a result of the “Manhattan Transfer,” the Dutch got what they wanted.  But the story did not have a happy ending for them. In 1770, A Frenchman Pierre Poivre (Peter Pepper), smuggled nutmeg trees out of the Banda Islands and successfully transplanted them in the French colony of Mauritius off the coast of East Africa, creating competition for the nutmeg trade. In 1778, a volcanic eruption caused a tsunami that wiped out many of the nutmeg groves in the Banda Islands. In 1809, the English reclaimed the Banda Islands but in 1817 returned them to the Dutch AFTER transplanting hundreds of nutmeg seedlings to their own colonies. The Dutch nutmeg monopoly was over! And some say it was the end of the Dutch as a power.

Banda nutmeg is still considered the finest nutmeg in the world, although it is grown in other places. The United States is the biggest importer of spices and New York celebrity chefs prize using their own spice mixes in their restaurants, the haunts of New York well-to-do. An ironic twist to the story.

And that is the rest of the fascinating history of nutmeg.


Maryann Readal is the Secretary of the Herb  Society of America. She is a member of the Texas Thyme Unit in Huntsville, TX.


Herb Society of America Medical Disclaimer … It is the policy of The Herb Society of America not to advise or recommend herbs for medicinal or health use. This information is intended for educational purposes only and should not be considered as a recommendation or an endorsement of any medical or health treatment.

HSA Webinar: Soothing Herbs & Gut Repair

By Jen MunsonBlog carminatives

During this season of change our digestive systems may struggle to adapt to the rich processed foods we are consuming. Carminatives can help to aid in gastric distress. Fortunately, most of our culinary herbs and spices are carminatives so we can enjoy their taste while aiding our guts. Common soothing herbs include peppermint, chamomile, fennel, and ginger.

Join us on Wednesday, November 20th at 1pm EST when clinical herbalist and author Maria Noël Groves, RH (AHG) returns to the HSA Webinar series just in time for the holidays. Maria’s practical approach to herbalism will inspire you to create your own digestive wellness tea using many of our lovely herbs.

Sign up for this webinar at https://www.herbsociety.org/hsa-learn/hsa-webinars/


 

Maria is the author of the bestselling, award-winning Body into Balance: An Herbal Guide to Holistic Self Care and the new Grow Your Own Herbal Remedies. Her books are a must in your herbal wellness library. They are beautifully sectioned out by ailment and how the related herbs support that part of your system. Maria runs Wintergreen Botanicals, nestled in the pine forests of New Hampshire. Her business is devoted to education and empowerment. Learn more about Maria and herbs at www.WintergreenBotanicals.com and be sure to sign up for her monthly newsletter.


Jen Munson is The Herb Society of America’s Education Chair. She discovered herbs when she stumbled upon her local unit’s herb and plant sale and hasn’t looked back since. Just recently she celebrated being a member of the NorthEast Seacoast Unit for 15 years!  


Herb Society of America Medical Disclaimer … It is the policy of The Herb Society of America not to advise or recommend herbs for medicinal or health use. This information is intended for educational purposes only and should not be considered as a recommendation or an endorsement of any medical or health treatment.

A Simple Gut Healing Chai Tea

By Maria Noël Groves, RH (AHG), Registered Clinical Herbalist and Bestselling Author

Maybe you drink chai tea in autumn because it’s warming, spicy, and delicious, and I certainly can’t blame you for that because it’s a favorite of mine for those reasons, too! But, did you know that chai spices like cinnamon, cardamom, and clove are supreme herbs for digestive health? And you can easily use them to flavor additional gut-supportive herbs that blend well and enhance the medicinal action while still tasting delicious!

First, I’d suggest ditching the black tea portion of a standard chai – partly because it’s

roots

Marshmallow root

often less soothing for the gut and also because the black tea will make a simmered or long-steeped chai blend taste terrible. Then, swap it out for cut and sifted marshmallow root. You could use marshmallow powder, but it turns to mucous-like slime in water – this is excellent for the gut but a little off putting. The chopped up roots (cut and sifted) offer gentler healing properties and a pleasant, velvety mouthfeel to the tea. Marshmallow (Althaea officinalis) has a mild, sweet flavor that smooths out the spices while soothing gut irritation and inflammation and promoting healing. The mucilage has this beneficial effect. It’s my absolute favorite herbal tea to support people with gastritis, reflux, GERD, ulcers, and while weaning off antacid/proton-pump inhibitor drugs (with a doctor’s supervision and guidance). You will notice some benefits immediately, but the real magic happens with long-term use. It extracts best in tea. Meanwhile, the spices stimulate healthy digestion, reduce inflammation, and discourage pathogens.

  • 1 heaping teaspoon cut and sifted dried marshmallow root

    spices PixabayDaria Yakokleva

    Pixabay – Daria Yakovleva

  • 2 cinnamons sticks (cinnamon powder will also turn to slime)
  • 7 whole cloves
  • 2 cardamom pods
  • 1 star anise pod

Now, brew the tea in one of four ways, using 16 ounces of water. Feel free to play around to find out which method you like best and is most convenient for your lifestyle. It can be drunk hot/reheated, room temperature, or cold.

  1. Cover the herbs with cold water in a French press or jar. Let steep overnight on the counter. Strain and drink that day. You’ll get mucilage and milder spice flavor.
  2. Cover herbs with hot water in a French press or jar. Let steep overnight on the counter. Strain and drink that day. You’ll get good mucilage and stronger spice flavor.
  3. In a well-insulated thermos that keeps tea hot for hours, cover the herbs in boiling hot water. Let steep at least 1 hour (longer is better) before straining to drink. This gets even stronger spice flavor but not as much mucilage.
  4. Simmer the herbs for 20 minutes, then strain. This offers the most potent spice flavor but the least amount of mucilage.

You could easily add other ingredients like plantain leaf, ginger, rose petals, fennel seeds, and a pinch of licorice to this tea blend, but the above blend is nice and simple and comes out great. It’s well tolerated by almost anyone and can be enjoyed as a tasty beverage tea even if you don’t have any particular digestive issues. Some people get a bit gassy from the mucilage; this is rare with cut and sifted herb, but if it happens to you, you can swap out the marshmallow root for marshmallow leaf.

Join me for a lunchtime webinar about “Soothing Herbs & Gut Repair” on Wednesday, November 20 at 1 pm Eastern Time! We’ll go deeper into the healing herbs and how to craft your own tea blend. https://www.herbsociety.org/hsa-learn/hsa-webinars/


webinar groves

Maria Noël Groves, RH (AHG) is the bestselling author of the award-winning Body into webinar groves bookBalance (now a core textbook in herb schools across the country) and Grow Your Own Herbal Remedies as well as the owner of Wintergreen Botanicals Herbal Clinic & Education Center in New Hampshire. She writes and teaches nationally about herbal medicine and offers both on-site and distance herbal study courses and health consultations. She’s a graduate of the Southwest School of Botanical Medicine and Sage Mountain among others and has more than 20 years of experience in herbalism. She’s an adjunct instructor for the Herbal Academy and a guest presenter at the Maryland University of Integrative BodyintobalanceHealth, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy, the American Holistic Nursing Association, and other schools and organizations. She melds evidence-based medicine, traditional Western herbalism, food-based nutrition, and personal clinical experience and presents at national herb and health conferences including the International Herbal Symposium, American Herbalists Guild Symposium, Great Lakes Herb Faire, New England Women’s Herbal Conference, the Mother Earth News Fair, and the Mountain Rose Herbs Free Herbalism Project. She’s a regular contributor to Herb Quarterly, Mother Earth Living, Mother Earth News, Taste for Life, and Remedies magazines. Learn more about herbal medicine as well as her classes, consultations, and to buy signed copies of her books with bonus goodies at https://wintergreenbotanicals.com


Herb Society of America Medical Disclaimer … It is the policy of The Herb Society of America not to advise or recommend herbs for medicinal or health use. This information is intended for educational purposes only and should not be considered as a recommendation or an endorsement of any medical or health treatment.